THE HEAT: THE REVIEW

Gotta love the work of Salty Kernel Alistair Shields, part of the condition of having a film in your top 20 list for the year was that it had to be reviewed on the site, his list came through late as he was away but with it, a review for THE HEAT, which he really wanted in his list. My personal opinions aside on the film, this is great stuff and nice work Kernel Alistair :). The Heat is out now on DVD and runs for 117mins – I have a feeling it is MA15+. Enjoy Alistair’s review below and if you have not seen our Top 20 films lists from 2013 then be sure to suss them out HERE.

 

Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Demián Bichir, Marlon Wayans, Michael Rapaport, Spoken Reasons, The Heat, The Heat Review, Alistair Shields, Paul Feig, Katie Dippold
THE HEAT – THE SALTY POPCORN REVIEW

 

The Heat delivers on what is a rare phenomenon in the Hollywood scene and that is a good girl buddy cop film. So rare in fact that I do believe it is the first that has been launched in major theatres and garnered both commercial and critical success. The two buddies in question come in the form of the talented Sandra Bullock (Miss Congeniality) and Melissa McCarthy (Identity Thief) who star as the police officers Sarah Ashburn and Shannon Mullins respectively.

The film is based on a Hollywood formula that is tried and true with Ashburn being the by-the-book-know-it-all cop while Mullins is the renegade rebellious one but The Heat does dust off the cobwebs a little bit through the gender shift, a solid script and good casting.

The story starts in New York with FBI agent Ashburn who is vying for a new promotion that has recently been made available and so to prove she has what it takes she is sent to the mean streets of Boston to help catch a local drug kingpin who goes by the name of Larkin. In enters local Boston detective Mullins who operates in a way that is in complete conflict with the way Ashburn operates so obviously they get paired together.

 

Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Demián Bichir, Marlon Wayans, Michael Rapaport, Spoken Reasons, The Heat, The Heat Review, Alistair Shields, Paul Feig, Katie Dippold
THE HEAT – THE SALTY POPCORN REVIEW

 

Using the power of the FBI through Ashburn and the local street knowledge of Mullins the two hunt down the local kingpin causing havoc and personal tribulations along the way. There are certainly some predictable elements to the script that most buddy cop films feel the need to go through every time such as the being fired/taken off the case only for the two to refuse orders and try and catch the criminal anyway but it is in the performances and the dialogue between the two main stars that gives this formula a new fresh of paint.

The banter between the two stars is witty, quick and at times scathing which makes for a great watch while the dialogue between the minor supporting characters also provides some great entertainment especially concerning one white albino. McCarthy is the catalyst of this great banter as she uses her experience as a stand up comedian to deliver lines with perfect timing and no doubt adding a few lines of her own which make for great laughs and give the feeling of some sort of natural flow. Bullock provides the rock that McCarthy needs to just bounce lines off and give the film some form of stability. The hat does go off to McCarthy though for stealing the scene from one with the acting credentials that Bullock has (admittedly the script made it easier) especially considering McCarthy’s relatively new foray into the movie world.

 

Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Demián Bichir, Marlon Wayans, Michael Rapaport, Spoken Reasons, The Heat, The Heat Review, Alistair Shields, Paul Feig, Katie Dippold
THE HEAT – THE SALTY POPCORN REVIEW

 

I also appreciated the change of the traditional gender roles in the film as well as it offers a new look into the buddy cop genre and one that has been sorely missing, especially in today’s society. This gender shift allows for a different type of dialogue and general feel than if it was Riggs and Murtagh (Lethal Weapon) on screen. However, for me the use of the female police officers did give me pause originally  as the words chick flick did come to mind especially considering it was a coppa film but I am happy to say that The Heat offers plenty of value for members of either sex.

In the end The Heat offers fans of the buddy cop enough familiarity that it will keep them happy but it also adds and changes some of the traditional elements that will entice those who generally don’t normally go for this particular type of film. A sequel is currently in production and my prediction is that it will be a sequel who will want to see.

 

3 and a Half Pops