KAREN MILLER’S THE FALCON THRONE | BOOK REVIEW

Canadian/ Australian fantasy and science fiction author Karen Miller is back with a new fantasy tale set for another large epic series. THE FALCON THRONE is her first installment in THE TARNISHED CROWN series. It is big, it is epic, and from Kernel Josh Browne’s review it appears to require some intense reading and high end language skills :). THE FALCON THRONE is out now from our good friends at Hachette Australia. It is 688 pages and is available at all good bookshops in soft cover and E-Book and now, enjoy Josh’s review….all the best….JK. 

 

REVIEW BY JOSH BROWNE

Set in an intriguing world THE FALCON THRONE is full of colourful characters, both in form and in language. Karen Miller, yes the same Karen Miller who wrote the Star wars novels, THE CLONE WARS: WILD SPACE, and THE CLONE WARS: GAMBIT, STEALTH AND SIEGE, as well as her fantasy novels including the THE INNOCENT MAGE sets up her THE TARNISHED CROWN epic fantasy series. THE FALCON THRONE is an elaborate tale of ambitious aristocrats whose capacity to inflict harm is as great as their sense of entitlement.

The storyline is set up in the distant past; the Kingdom of Harcia was torn apart by royal brothers who could not accept a lesser inheritance. Now, the consequences of their actions are coming to light. Balfre, son of Aimery, Duke of Harcia, is his father’s heir. But he has dreams of a crown, not a coronet. He dreams himself the King of a Harcia re-united, but his brother Grefin, their father’s favourite, stands in his way. Harald, debauched Duke of neighbouring Clemen, is feared and despised by his nobles. He thinks he can trust his bastard-born cousin Ederic … but Ederic fears for the duchy and will do what he must to save it. And caught between dangers is Harald’s infant son, Liam. Stolen by his nurse, vanished into the lawless Marches, he is the spark that will grow to set the world on fire.

 

THE FALCON THRONE BOOK COVER IMAGE
THE FALCON THRONE BY KAREN MILLER | SALTY POPCORN BOOK REVIEW | BOOK COVER IMAGE

 

In Clemen, Duke Harold’s egregious offenses provoke fellow Clemen Roric to depose him, but the good intentions of the usurper are sadly undermined by his inability to recognize when he’s offending those he depends on. In Harcia, disgraced heir Balfre is canny enough to play a long game to win the position and power to which he feels entitled. Few know that Harold’s son is alive and plotting against Roric, and none suspect that the ancient mage Salimbene and his network of scheming witches are orchestrating the spiral into chaos.

From the onset I found this book both too full of unusual dialogue, and just too much dialogue, with all sorts of strange words creeping in, it did help set the scene but I would often skim the words to get to one I could wrap my head around. With each different area having characters with different dialect and way of speaking it did paint a creepy medieval feeling.

I also had a lot of trouble connecting with many of the characters. The ones who were technically the good guys were not so developed with the more interesting, though not necessarily likable, characters were the not-very-nice ones. ‘

This wasn’t my cup of tea but it may well enthral more seasoned fantasy readers.

 

2 and a Half Pops

 

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