MOLLY MAXWELL: A REVIEW FOR THE UPCOMING POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

MOLLY MAXWELL is part of the upcoming POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL that takes place in Sydney at Dendy Opera Quays and Dendy Newtown – it is a festival of independent American and Canadian film – running from the 8th to the 18th of August. It has a phenomenal line up of films and if you want your mind broadened and want to see some great films that are not Hollywood made then suss out this festival. You can get all the information you need from HERE and now enjoy Salty Kernel, Dara Shashoua’s review of Molly Maxwell.

Charlie Carrick, dara shashoua, independent film, Lola Tash, molly maxwell, molly maxwell film, molly maxwell review, possible worlds, possible worlds film festival, Sara St. Onge
MOLLY MAXWELL, A SALTY POPCORN REVIEW FOR THE POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

 

I wish I had Molly’s life when I was 16.  There I said it.

Why. You ask?

Firstly, Molly’s family.  Her dad, played by Rob Stewart, runs a record label and steals her off to live gigs all the time and in one scene offers Molly either the opportunity to go to a secret gig or have a Guitar Hero marathon.  Awesome.  Her Mum, played by Krista Bridges, is the quintessential modern Mum who is trying to be friends with her teenage daughter whilst also playing the role of the parent.  There was a moment in the film where as she is leaving she offers Molly dinner and tells her that there is Kale and Quinoa soup in the fridge.  I smiled because that sounds like so many people I know.

Secondly, Molly attends Phoenix Progressive School, (which is really Inglenook Community High School in Canada) it is the coolest school on the planet.  Instead of desks and chairs, students sit in the classroom on old sofas or dining tables re-purposed as desks.  Creativity oozes from the pores of this school.  My favourite character of the film was Raymond (Richard Clarkin) the headmaster.  He had amazing one-liners such as –

‘Are your moons out of orbit or something?’

As the school is classed as progressive, students are essentially allowed to pursue any creative art that they chose. This is where we meet Molly – she had tried many electives but was yet to choose her final one so that she could finish school.  Molly is an extremely intelligent girl with a higher IQ than most but I think she struggles with trying to be ordinary when surrounded by so much extraordinariness (yes, I just made up a new word). When really she is extraordinary herself.   It is her English teacher, Ben (the gorgeous Charlie Carrick) that helps her see how extraordinary she can be.

 

Charlie Carrick, dara shashoua, independent film, Lola Tash, molly maxwell, molly maxwell film, molly maxwell review, possible worlds, possible worlds film festival, Sara St. Onge
MOLLY MAXWELL, A SALTY POPCORN REVIEW FOR THE POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

 

Molly decides to choose the elective of Photography, and asks for her English teacher Ben to supervise and teach her. And, this dear reader, is where the trouble beings.

Her teacher, Ben is a gorgeous ex-musician who is now a teacher and who tells his students like it is.  He doesn’t mess around, and him and Molly start to form a bond as he takes her under his wing to teach her photography. And he makes a point of teaching her properly, using a film (gasp!) camera and a dark room. Quite quickly you can see there is a bond that is moving past the standard student and teacher relationship.

Molly Maxwell tells a very believable tale about how a young teacher and a student could develop feelings for each other.  Teenagers these days are a lot older and more experienced than 20 years ago.  Teachers are 21 when they start teaching, a 5-year age gap in the real world is not really an issue.  But it becomes one when it is a student/teacher relationship.

 

Charlie Carrick, dara shashoua, independent film, Lola Tash, molly maxwell, molly maxwell film, molly maxwell review, possible worlds, possible worlds film festival, Sara St. Onge
MOLLY MAXWELL, A SALTY POPCORN REVIEW FOR THE POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

 

Lola Tash is outstanding as Molly Maxwell, there are moments when you believe she is an adult but then she does something else and you remember she is only 16.  Like many of the 16 year olds now, not quite an adult and not quite a teenager, which is definitely, an awkward time for all involved, including her family.  Once the relationship with Ben evolves you see her alienating friends and family and when things start to go wrong she acts out, like a 16 year old would do.

Ben, played by Charlie Carrick is simply gorgeous, who wouldn’t fall for him? I think he is a lost soul and constantly struggling with the relationship and forgets that he is dealing with a 16 year old.

 

Charlie Carrick, dara shashoua, independent film, Lola Tash, molly maxwell, molly maxwell film, molly maxwell review, possible worlds, possible worlds film festival, Sara St. Onge
MOLLY MAXWELL, A SALTY POPCORN REVIEW FOR THE POSSIBLE WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

 

This is Sara St. Onge’s first feature film, and hopefully not her last.  The film was partially funded by the CFC, Canadian Film Council and partially by crowd funding through the site indiegogo.  They crowd funded in order to not have to ‘cut everything that isn’t absolutely necessary’.  The page on the site is hilarious – $22 for hair Dye because it’s not easy (or cheap) getting alternative school kids to have every colour of hair in the rainbow.  Or, $90 an extra extra, because isn’t it the worst when ‘party’ scenes only seem to have 3 people paraded back and forth in different clothing changes.’

Hilarious.

You can see the page here

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/molly-maxwell-feature-film

It’s worth viewing just to see the awkward video of Charlie Carrick asking people for money.

All in all I think Molly Maxwell is an awesome coming of age indie film.

 

4 Pops