LOVE ROSIE | MOVIE REVIEW

LOVE ROSIE is a romcom that enters the realm of a billion other romcoms. This one is loosley based on a popular novel by Cecelia Ahern but has some major changes, most notable, this one is set over 12yrs where the book is set over 45yrs. It’s let downs appear to be made up by stunning cinematography and superb chemistry but don’t rely on my opening babble, suss Kernel Emma’s fine review. LOVE ROSIE is out today, Thursday 6th November 2014 in Australia. It is released from StudioCanal, is rated M and runs for 102mins. All the best………JK.

 

LOVE ROSIE MOVIE POSTER IMAGE
LOVE ROSIE | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | MOVIE POSTER

 

REVIEW BY EMMA BISHOP

Audiences are navigated through the all too familiar “will they, wont they” in Christian Ditter’s latest romantic comedy LOVE ROSIE. Based on Irish novel “Where Rainbow’s End” by Cecelia Ahern, LOVE ROSIE’s uncomplicated plotline is compensated for by its vivacious leads and striking cinematography. The film has its fair share of cringe-worthy awkward moments and it will be fairly pertinent to its tech-savvy teen audience. Teenagers aside, the film demonstrates its humour on a very basic level and is receiving mixed reviews from critics and audiences alike. The gorgeous on-screen chemistry between Collins and Claflin is, sufficiently, distracting from the narrative turmoil that is the film’s plotline.

 

LOVE ROSIE MOVIE IMAGE
LOVE ROSIE | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | YOUNG ALEX (TIGHE WARDELL) AND YOUNG ROSIE (BEAU ROSE GARRATT)

 

Alex (Sam Claflin) and Rosie (Lily Collins) have been inseparable since childhood, so much so they have fallen madly in love. In true rom-com style the pair is met with one painstaking complication after another. Things take a turn for the worst when they decide against taking one another to the high-school formal. In an effort to prove she isn’t interested in Alex, Rosie is accompanied by popular jock Greg (Christian Cooke). What results from the evening is a very uncomfortable sex scene, a lost condom and you guessed it… an unplanned pregnancy. With Alex headed to England to study at Harvard, Rosie is thrust into solo motherhood and the complications just keep on coming. Three Weddings, a funeral and a baby ensue as the plot moves rapidly through the next twelve years of Rosie and Alex’s lives. Alex, now married and underwhelmed with his suburban life, reaches out to Rosie, who is ready and waiting. Unsurprisingly, when the two re-connect they continue to share a very tedious, unresolved sexual tension. While the narrative spans twelve years of Rosie and Alex’s adult lives, the pair do not appear to age over the entirety of the film. Nowhere is this more evident than when Rosie’s daughter reaches teen-hood and comes uncomfortably close to outgrowing her mother. As the film draws to its heavily clichéd culmination, it is fairly satisfying to see that true love prevails. My inner cynic would have preferred something a bit more tangible but a little bit of escapism never goes amiss.

 

LOVE ROSIE MOVIE IMAGE
LOVE ROSIE | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | ALEX (SAM CLAFLIN)

 

Despite the film’s predictable narrative, Collins is delightful in her role and brings a certain sensibility which is seldom found elsewhere. There is no risk of Collins being out shadowed by her famous father and at twenty five the actress, model and writer is one to look out for. Naturally, she would have been even more fantastic if the narrative had given her the opportunity but she did very well none-the-less. In a pleasant addition her young pregnancy is not characterised as a burden and she is instead stronger and happier than her male counterpart in his dreary middle class existence. To say the handling of her pregnancy was progressive would be over the top but I did appreciate her momentary independence. As well as caring for her daughter, Rosie goes on to purchase her own hotel chain, giving audiences a glimmer of hope that a woman can do it all (this doesn’t last long enough). Claflin is equally charming as Alex and is reminiscent of a younger Hugh Grant. While he’s previously received screen time in Pirates of the Caribbean and The Hunger Games, this will no doubt be his breakthrough role. A special mention must also be made to Rosie’s quirky best girlfriend Ruby (Jaime Winstone). She is colourful and eccentric; I wish they had given her more screen time.

 

LOVE ROSIE MOVIE IMAGE
LOVE ROSIE | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | ROSIE (LILY COLLINS)

 

Visually LOVE ROSIE is very beautiful and Cinematographer Christian Rein clearly has an eye for lighting. Even in the dreariest of scenes, the clever use of natural sunlight and pastel filters give the picture a youthful, pretty essence. I particularly enjoyed the English suburban backdrop; however geographically correct it was is another question. Much like the subject matter, the mise en scene is very romantic, providing a delightful milieu for a teenage love story. On the whole the picture cannot be faulted and was my highpoint of the film.

If you’re looking for a film with essence, that will stick with you as you leave the theatre, LOVE ROSIE is not for you. If you’re looking for pleasant escapism with a pretty backdrop, by all means you will love it. Admittedly this is the first romantic film I have seen in sometime and regrettably will be the last I watch for a while. Ultimately the film failed to take me through the plethora of emotions I had expected; the trailer will give you all the highlights of the narrative in a couple of minutes. For a dreadfully long time we have continued to ask the same question, “can a heterosexual friendship ever remain purely platonic?” and once again we are given the same answer. I just can’t help but think it’s time for something new…

 

2 and a Half Pops