KINO SYDNEY | WIN TIX

KINO SYDNEY is a splendid monthly event that promotes short films and filmmakers and allows them a forum to present and be judged and interviewed, all fairly and with encouragement. Kernel Hyo-Jin Shim attended KINO #85 in Sydney and watched a bunch of short films, listened to and ran her own interviews of filmmakers, feasted on beer and pizzas, watched stand-up comedians, heard a script reading and had a ball, all in three hours for an all inclusive $15- ticket price. What a sensational idea from these people. I look forward to attending one of these events in the future. The lovely people at Kino Sydney are offering up two tickets to the next event which is this Monday 1st September. Find out at the bottom of Hyo’s article on how to win and do not forget to check out their website for upcoming news and events – HERE. All the best……JK.

 

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KINO SYDNEY | SALTY POPCORN ATTENDS THE EVENT | THE SCREEN AND THE STAGE (ALL IMAGES FROM KAT PICTURES)

 

EVENT PROMOTION BY HYO-JIN SHIM

Salty Popcorn was invited to review last month’s Kino Sydney night, which is a film-making event based at their new venue Project 107, Regent St, Redfern (1 minute walk from the station/ bus-stop with plenty of on-street parking available). It is also known as “Kino Kabaret” which is a film-making lab that originally kicked off with the local artists of Montreal, Canada. This movement is now widely practised across the world (over 20 countries and 50+ locations). In the spirit of collaboration and motivation, Kino attracts the emerging and professional film-makers to this space as a platform to practice their film-making without judgement and to freely support each other by strengthening the movie/audio visual/time-based art-making practices for future projects.

The night goes like this; the first half hour is to enter the Project 107 gallery space, grab a drink or two (ales and non-alcoholic drinks) and bite to eat (pizza – vegetarians are catered for) – all part of the $15 entry. At 6.30pm, everyone moves into the cinema, where it seats over 60 people – it was pretty much full house when we went, with plenty of stools provided for the overflow audience plus some cushions to sit on the front floor space.

 

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KINO SYDNEY | SALTY POPCORN ATTENDS THE EVENT | SAMUEL HILTON INTERVIEWING A FILMMAKER (ALL IMAGES FROM KAT PICTURES)

 

The host, Samuel Hilton introduced the night and went through the night’s proceedings of what we should expect as the audience. The night was to premiere the shorts for the night and hold Q&A sessions with the filmmakers afterwards. The rules of the premiere screenings were straightforward; it must be screened at Kino first, have their logo and screening number added in credits and must be less than five minutes in length.

The screenings were of high quality and the sound was clearly audible for the audience to hear through to the back. The cinematic space felt really comfortable, clean, and had an aisle in the middle – which made it feel like a theatre where the filmmakers would walk down for their Q&A. The screenings were all very impressive, some of which were like music clips, with a soundtrack, others with narrative stories (Three Act plots) and one animation (which was executed by a professional director/animator who flew up from Melbourne to screen his work).

 

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KINO SYDNEY | SALTY POPCORN ATTENDS THE EVENT | SAMUEL HILTON INTERVIEWING JEANNE TIAN AND SAMUEL INGLIS (ALL IMAGES FROM KAT PICTURES)

 

After the screenings, we had Q&As which were quite interesting to observe, lots of tips and information about how they made it, what budget they had set and actualised and more. During intermission, I was able to interview some of the film-makers that night; in particular, Jeanne Tian (and Samuel Inglis) with their first ever short titled KILLING TIME (one of my favourites from the night).

  • How would you describe your short film?

Conditioned by Hollywood, a successful businessman attempts to commit suicide through methods which he’s seen in the movies. To his surprise, this doesn’t exactly work out….

  • Was this your first kino experience? how did you hear about it?

Indeed this was my first Kino experience. We heard about it from a friend of ours so we decided to check it out.

  • How long have you been making movies/short films/productions?

KILLING TIME was actually my very first film; so not very long at all.

  • How do you feel your film was received by the audience tonight?

I was extremely anxious about how the audience would react but to my delight, they were thoroughly entertained. I had people approach me during the break to say they had a blast so I think it’s safe to say it was received well.

  • What compels you to make films? or in other words, why do you make films ? 

Films have been a prominent part of my life since a young age. There’s no experience quite as immersive as sitting in a theatre and watching a movie because it arrests so many of your senses. It’s a truly captivating artform that continually impacts audiences and I hope to one day be part of that.

  • Would you come back to do another kino film challenge? 

Absolutely, Kino was a ton of fun.

  • What would you say to other filmmakers about kino? 

Screen it at Kino! The audience is so lovely (except for when they want you to make a challenge film) and it’s a great chance to be part of a supportive community that appreciates cinema.

 

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KINO SYDNEY | SALTY POPCORN ATTENDS THE EVENT | SHANE ADDISON (ALL IMAGES FROM KAT PICTURES)

 

After the premieres, we had comedians do their standup (Shane Addison, Chris Kearey and Tim Baines) – all three were performing at the Sydney Fringe next month (1-30 Sept). This was quite a nice surprise (as they were invited by the host Sam, as they usually run their own circuit of comedy nights in Sydney), then we broke for intermission with some networking with the like-minded, with more drinks and pizza to be had.

After intermission, they had a few more screenings contributed by other film-makers, some were made three years ago, others premiered at other spaces previously, and the challenges set by the previous month (these challenges are for the previous shorts that did not quite abide by the Kino rules – e.g. ran over 5 minutes, did not include the Kino screening number, etc).

By this time, it was 9.30pm where there was a live reading of a screenplay cited by a group of actors.

 

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KINO SYDNEY | SALTY POPCORN ATTENDS THE EVENT | VANESSA DANG AND CHRIS EVANS (ALL IMAGES FROM KAT PICTURES)

 

The finish time was set for 10pm, so there you go – you have 3-4 hours of films, comedians, live actor readings, an opportunity to make new friends and collaborate with other film-makers, with drinks and food all taken care of. All for a price of a modest meal (you get two beers and as much pizza you can stuff your face with) . So, who needs the couch on a Monday night after a weekend of R&R – we don’t, we need inspiration and people to know and collaborate with. This event is only once a month. Aside from getting to watch your shorts on the big screen, you can watch other people’s projects and get involved for the next event (or, not – you just enjoy and experience the jam-packed night). GO check it out !!

 

With special thanks to KINO SYDNEY to win the double pass to Kino #86 on Monday September 1st 2014 you need to either like and share this post on Facebook or retweet/ favourite it on Twitter, you then need to leave a comment below stating the answer to the following question:

What makes a good short film?

If you are the winner your name will be placed on the door, this will be drawn tomorrow. Good luck! Oh, and minor housekeeping – huge apologies for overseas readers, this competition is only available to Australian residents unless you can make it to Sydney before Monday :).

 

** All photographs from Kat Pictures