GINGER AND ROSA: THE REVIEW

This looks like an amazing film with an even more amazing cast – Elle Fanning and newcomer, Alice Englert, and then supporting cast from Christina Hendricks, Alessandro Nivola, Annette Bening, Oliver Platt and Timothy Spall. GINGER AND ROSA is screening as part of the Melbourne International Film Festival. It is nicely reviewed, as always, by Salty Kernel DARA SHASHOUA. It still has one screening remaining at the festival – Tomorrow, Sunday 4th August at 7pm at The Forum Theatre. Tickets can be purchased for the film HERE and be sure to suss out their website for the entire HERE. If you miss this one – have no fear – it will most likely be getting a cinematic art house release.

 

Sally Potter, Timothy Spall, Alice Englert, Oliver Platt, Jodhi May, Alessandro Nivola, Christina Hendricks, Elle Fanning, Annette Bening, Ginger and Rosa, Ginger and Rosa Movie, Ginger and Rosa Review, Dara Shashoua, Transmission Films, MIFF, Melbourne International Film Festival,
GINGER AND ROSA: THE SALTY POCORN REVIEW

 

Ginger and Rosa is the beautifully directed film by Sally Potter (Orlando, The Tango Lesson, The Man Who Cried), set in 1960s London during the Cuban missile crisis.  Ginger (Elle Fanning) and Rosa (Alice Englert) were born on the same day; their mothers are best friends and they have done EVERYTHING together as only girls can do.  It is like they are one person with two bodies.  They know everything about the other, but now they are sixteen and their differences begin to show.

Ginger is very concerned about the possibility of the world ending and cannot understand how no one else around her cannot be as concerned as she is at this impending doom.  Even her best friend seems more concerned about boys and sex at this point and Ginger struggles on a daily basis with this.

Ginger’s parents, Natalie (the stunning Christina Hendricks) and Roland (Alessandro Nivola), are a dysfunctional family who separate at this time of world unrest and this shakes Ginger to her core.  She sees her mother as a sad woman who is not strong enough to do what she wants instead what she is ‘supposed’ to do.  Her father is a freethinking philandering professor who teaches Ginger to fight for what she believes in whilst at the same time refuses to acknowledge his responsibilities, namely Ginger and her mother.

 

Sally Potter, Timothy Spall, Alice Englert, Oliver Platt, Jodhi May, Alessandro Nivola, Christina Hendricks, Elle Fanning, Annette Bening, Ginger and Rosa, Ginger and Rosa Movie, Ginger and Rosa Review, Dara Shashoua, Transmission Films, MIFF, Melbourne International Film Festival,
GINGER AND ROSA: THE SALTY POCORN REVIEW

 

Becoming sixteen is a seminal time in any child’s life, no longer a child and on your way to becoming an adult.  It is the age of experimentation. Whilst Ginger is experimenting with her political activism and writing poetry, Rosa is experimenting with make up and boys.  They are starting to grow apart and there is a pivotal moment in the film that shows how truly different they are.

Ginger’s godfathers, Mark 1 (Timothy Spall) and Mark 2 (Oliver Platt), and their long time American poetic friend Bella (Annette Benning) are a supportive second family to Ginger whilst everything else in her life is turning upside down.  In the final scenes of the film, which are some of the most amazingly emotional scenes I have seen in a while, they are the glue which is holding her life together whilst her family falls apart.  They are the ones who finally get Ginger to talk about everything that is going on within the family.

 

Sally Potter, Timothy Spall, Alice Englert, Oliver Platt, Jodhi May, Alessandro Nivola, Christina Hendricks, Elle Fanning, Annette Bening, Ginger and Rosa, Ginger and Rosa Movie, Ginger and Rosa Review, Dara Shashoua, Transmission Films, MIFF, Melbourne International Film Festival,
GINGER AND ROSA: THE SALTY POCORN REVIEW

 

Elle Fanning, where do I begin?  She was just 13 when filming Ginger and Rosa and she plays a 16 year old.  This is her break out film; it is worth seeing purely for her performance. To be so young and able to hold an entire film like this is nothing short of amazing.  She is a force to be reckoned with and I just love her.  Her accent is spot on, however Brits may pick up on some nuances, but you would have no idea she is a bubbly 13 year old American girl.

Alice Englert is perfect as the broody sixteen year old that blames her mother for her father leaving and resents her implicitly.  You may recognise her from Beautiful Creatures, again another young actress who has a stellar future on the big screen.

The entire cast in Ginger and Rosa is jaw droppingly good and make this film a must see. Not sure if it will get an Australian release as it seems to be out on DVD overseas. (JK NOTE: Transmission Films is the Australian Distributor and they have not listed it yet – I do think it will get an art house cinematic release soon).

 

3 and a Half Pops