THE IMITATION GAME | MOVIE REVIEW

THE IMITATION GAME is a definite Oscar contender for the next awards, it is starring the most loved Benedict Cumberbatch, everyone is on the Cumberbatch train at the moment and he can do no wrong in the eyes of the world. Could this be the WWII Enigma movie the world has been waiting for? Check out Kernel Emma Bishop’s review to find out. THE IMITATION GAME is releasing on January 1st, 2015, in Australia, care of Roadshow Films. It is rated M and runs for 114mins. All the best………..JK.

 

THE IMITATION GAME MOVIE POSTER IMAGE
THE IMITATION GAME | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | MOVIE POSTER

 

REVIEW BY EMMA BISHOP

Cumberbatch is phenomenal in Norwegian director Morten Tyldum’s film THE IMITATION GAME which tells the story of highly intelligent cryptologist Alan Turing. With a backdrop of World War II, the biopic centres on Turing’s involvement in cracking the Enigma code which was an essential breakthrough in Britain’s success in the war. While Cumberbatch absolutely steals the show, the quick sharp dialogue, witty humour and fantastic cast are all equal parts in creating this extremely well-received, award winning film. A colourful and extremely determined man, Turing’s is a story that needed to be told and one which a wide audience will be intrigued to hear.

Set in Britain’s top secret Government Code and Cypher School, THE IMITATION GAME follows Turing and his team of expert mathematicians in their race to crack the German’s communication code and end the war for Britain. Not to be mistaken for a war drama, the film is certainly a biopic and Tyldum provides an in-depth, while slightly impersonal, analysis of Turing’s eccentric disposition. With the use of a sharp, intelligent script we enter the room alongside the mathematicians as day in- day out they work to crack the code, only for it to change again at the end of the day. While the subject matter is serious in its nature, Turing’s arrogance and lack of social intelligence result in some very humorous dialogue. What do you expect when you throw a bunch of highly intelligent chess players and mathematical geniuses in the same room? With Winston Churchill offering the mathematicians unlimited resources to fulfil their almost impossible task, the pressure is extremely high. So high in fact, the mathematicians must solve twenty million years of settings in only twenty minutes. Once the code is cracked, this group of mathematicians have the power to decrypt the German code and stop many of the attacks on innocent British civilians. With such an impossible task at hand, Turing decides to fight machine with machine and build an encryption device of his own; everything is history from there on.

 

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THE IMITATION GAME | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, KEIRA KNIGHTLEY, MATTHEW GOODE, JACK GOOD AND ALLEN LEECH

 

While the historical analysis of Alan Turing’s life is fantastic, I was left longing to learn more about his personal life. Being a homosexual in the 1960’s, Turing was ostracised as a teen and later in life criminally prosecuted. With such an incredibly sad demise, the storyline rarely touched on his romantic life and there wasn’t one sex scene throughout the film. In fact it wasn’t until the very end of THE IMITATION GAME where we were given a sense of Turing’s grossly immoral treatment and deeply sympathised with him. What the film did explore was Turing’s relationship with wife and fellow mathematician Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley). I really enjoyed Knightley in this role; she was very sincere and painted Clarke as an extremely supportive counterpart. On the whole the film is successful in paying tribute to a man, who having made such a life-changing breakthrough, had previously received very little attention. While the film did shy away from Turing’s personal life it certainly gives him the recognition he deserved for being a brilliant mathematician.

 

THE IMITATION GAME MOVIE REVIEW
THE IMITATION GAME | SALTY POPCORN MOVIE REVIEW | JOAN CLARKE (KEIRA KNIGHTLEY) & ALAN TURING (BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH)

 

Perfecting a screenplay, particularly when the story is not only factual but also rather delicate is no easy task and Graham Moore does an absolutely fantastic job. Told in three separate parts, the film uses a non-linear narrative structure to build on Turing’s young adult life while also educating audiences on the harsh consequences of the war. There is a phenomenal amount of information included in the two hour film and yet at no point does it feel overloaded. Told through a series of flashbacks, we gain a real sense of Turing’s awkward disposition and nativity against social norms. The juxtaposition of Turing working, with shocking images of the war gives audiences a real sense of the severity of the situation. Perhaps the most effective of these being a sweeping shot of young children wearing gas masks. When discussing the narrative structure of the film, Moore noted “We were going to take these three periods, chop them up out of order, present them to you out of order so they can ask questions of one another, and so during the whole movie the audience would kind of be like Alan Turing, trying to solve a puzzle the same way he was trying to solve a puzzle”. There is no doubt audiences will respond incredibly well to this mode of storytelling, I know that I enjoyed it.

THE IMITATION GAME is an incredibly important film, which is thoroughly successful in its biographical commentary and casting. Cumberbatch will be sure to win an Oscar and this is a film which will generate buzz long after its release. This is not a pleasant story and audiences are taken through a plethora of emotions as we learn about the life of Alan Turing. It is however a wonderful example of the power of visual storytelling and I could not possibly recommend it more.

 

4 Pops